Toast for Thanksgiving

I confess have a favorite movie—Babette’s Feast*. Like Jesus, Babette prepared a feast for a village of enemies—of each other. The table is set with mercy, peace and reconciliation. I hope you’ll watch it someday. Near the end, Old Lorens, a surprising character in the story, offers a great toast…

“Mercy and truth have met together. Righteousness and bliss shall kiss one another. Man, in his weakness and shortsightedness believes he must make choices in this life. He trembles at the risks he takes. We do know fear. But no. Our choice is of no importance. There comes a time when our eyes are opened and we come to realize that mercy is infinite. We need only await it with confidence and receive it with gratitude. Mercy imposes no conditions. And lo! Everything we have chosen has been granted to us. And everything we rejected has also been granted. Yes, we even get back what we rejected. For mercy and truth have met together, and righteousness and bliss shall kiss one another.” —Old Lorens Lowenhielm, Babette’s Feast

“Hallelujah!”

—j

*Rated ‘G’, French-Danish, with subtitles

Not Turkey Day

“Without God, what does being “thankful” really mean? Does it have any meaning at all, even in the moment?” —Pastor Jack Abeelen

This week we Americans will feast and give thanks. We don’t thank the earth for giving us food or life—our planet doesn’t give us anything on purpose. We don’t laude over a dead bird for its contribution to our waistlines—it didn’t die for our dining pleasure—it cared for nothing beyond its own survival. George Washington didn’t decree a national feast to thank a cook or he might have named it “Thank-a-Cook Day”.

Thanksgiving Day is the great why, when we’re reminded to thank the One Who gave us all good things—especially His Son to die in our place—not because we are good but because, to the Lord God Almighty, King of the Universe, we’re significant. That is tremendous.

Happy Thanksgiving.

—j

 

Sometimes There Are No Roads

Had supper yet? Feast on this…

“I have learned…to let God be the mystery that He is and, with eyes wide open, to pursue Him, not with the precision of a crossword puzzle fanatic but with the reckless passion of a pilot flying into the Bermuda Triangle. Following Christ is a wild adventure full of risk, frustration, excitement and setbacks. It is not an evening stroll in a planned community along a well-manicured path…” —Larry Crabb

Let the adventure begin.

Have a great weekend…!

—j